Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Spring Showers Over Sacramento

Acrylic on stretched canvas. 8"X10". In Sacramento, we have something called the Yolo Bypass. It was built around the turn of the 20th century. It is basically a huge weir that diverts a certain amount of water from the Sacramento River during our rainy season to prevent the flooding of Sacramento. The water flows into a gigantic low lying basin where rice is grown during the summer. The basin is also a huge bird sanctuary for local and migratory birds such as ducks and egrets. From the western side of the basin, you can look over to the eastern side and see the skyline of Sacramento. This is that view. The areas of water that you see are the lowest parts of the basin. On a really wet season, enough water is diverted to make the basin look like a huge lake,

11 comments:

Fay Akers said...

wonderful art, and thanks for sharing the story behind the art.

David Lobenberg said...

Thank you, Fay.

AutumnLeaves said...

A gorgeous tempest you've captured here, David!

Sandra said...

What a dramatic and wonderful painting!

meera said...

wonderfully expressive --I love the contrast between big clouds and tiny buildings :) definitely conveys the vastness of the landscape.

Sue Pownall (aka travelingsuep) said...

Great painting - very dramatic.

That "shower" looks very heavy though, sure it wasn't spring downpour on S?

David Lobenberg said...

Autumn, Thank you. Not to many art buyers purchase tempest paintings, but I couldn't help myself!

David Lobenberg said...

Sandra, Thanks. I LOVE heavy rain clouds. I wish I was under one as I write this!

David Lobenberg said...

Meera, You hit the nailright on the head...big cloud+tiny buildings= vastness. Here's another one I just figured out (It took a lot of mathematics on my part, but I did it!)...e=mc squared :-)

David Lobenberg said...

Sue, It is a spring downpour. Do you get a lot of rain in Britain? :-)

Sue Pownall (aka travelingsuep) said...

Only spend about 30 days a year in Uk, but definitely in the autumn, winter & spring.