Thursday, May 22, 2008

Vic Fazio Bird Sanctuary




The two smaller acrylics were painted on MDF board about 2 months ago. One is under the freeway or Yolo Causeway that goes over the bird sanctuary.Tthe sanctuary also functions as a rice growing area and in the winter, a flood run off zone. Each painting measures 8"X10"." Under The Causeway" was an exercise in perspective and value. The second painting gives you a view of the freeway. No birds!...when I set up my easel, they fly away...not very trusting of plein air painters! The larger painting is on stretched canvas (12"X16") and was painted spring of '07. A few hours ago I "improved" it by working the sky, reeds, and water just a tad.

23 comments:

bonnieluria said...

Compelling composition in the first painting- the way the verticals and horizontals pull you in to that strip of light in the back. Great treatment of the puddles of water too.

David Lobenberg said...

Bonnielurie (can I write just Bonnie?): That is what attracted me to paint this view...spot on!

bonnieluria said...

Bonnie it is so please do.
I just ordered Hammonds' book on Painting With Light with Acrylics ( or close to that ) after your recommendation.

Seeing your work and the process of your work which is similar to mine, keeps my interest in acrylic alive.

I do the same thing- lots of layering and taking advantage of the forgiveness of the quick dry.

Your work keeps me inpsired.
So glad I found your site!

David Lobenberg said...

Bonnie: We acrylicers need to stick together! Once you get your hands on Hammond's book (and he has a wonderful DVD as well!), you will stay with acrylic. I'm flattered that my work inspires you. Hey, check out Nicholas Simmons blog (I have a link to his blog). He does mixed media-watercolor and acrylic. Have you ever tried fluid acrylics? I may post a piece just finished for a workshop this Saturday that is a combination heavy body and fluid acrylic.

bonnieluria said...

I do use heavy body, and fluid sometimes because I try new brands and other times because the color I want isn't available in one form so I opt for another.
As I'm sure you know, colors vary from brand to brand so unlike oils where you can use 6 colors to make 20, I find with acrylic, that's harder to do.
For areas where I want color that I can manipulate on the canvas, the heavy body is great.
For good overall coverage, the fluid colors are good.
Golden has an abundance of information and help. They've sent me a thick folder with very detailed info on color mixing, mediums, and everything you ever needed to know.
I would love to see your new posting.

David Lobenberg said...

When you get the Hammond book, you'll see he only works with Liquitex cad. red light and medium, cad. yellow light and med., I think red oxide or burnt sienna, thalo blue and light blue violet. I also try to minimize the colors I use otherwise you don't become well versed in mixing and manipulating colors on your paintings. Wait until you see his paintings and range of color keys.

bonnieluria said...

I'm eagerly waiting for the book. And it's interesting that the palette you describe is the classic limited one that oil painters use.
Here's what I'd like to find out: How do you lighten colors ( acrylics dry darker ) without adding too much white which I find, makes everything look chalky and pasty?

There must be some layering technique that I haven't figured out yet.

Thanks so much for your suggestions -it's really helpful and I appreciate it.

Jack Riddle said...

David--I'm really enjoying your posts. They're not only inspiring but instructive--and well written. Please keep 'em coming. Jack

rob ijbema said...

these are all very fine paintings david,love the composition in the first,the shadowed water is so well done!
sio is the water in the third.
also like the wip with the tree and shed below,those greens are cool!

David Lobenberg said...

Thank you so much Jack. I notice that you visit Frank Gardner's blot on a regular basis. It's a great blog. I go there myself to see his paintings and read about his painting process. This blog business is better than sliced bread, ain't it?

David Lobenberg said...

Thank you Mr. super duper race car painter in far off Wales, UK!

David Lobenberg said...

Bonnie: Do you use a gloss glazing medium or when you finish your painting, do you add a simi or gloss glaze? I don't use a gloss glazing medium as much as John Hammond. He can't paint without it.

Bill Sharp said...

David these are wonderful. They're beautifully observed. Great colors and brushwork.
It seems that most acrylic painters tend to use colors that I find harsh but you've tamed that beast.

David Lobenberg said...

"tamed the beast"...I like that Bill! Actually, I'm trying to tame the beast...work in progress.

bonnieluria said...

I found a satin Glazing liquid by Golden that I've used in the past to get a loose wash, overlay effect.

I haven't found an effective way to lighten colors without getting that pasty look from too much white.
And as Bill Sharp mentions above, too often, Acrylics look harsh and lack the subtle, buttery effect of oils.
That's where the glaze comes in handy- if I use a compliment color in a light wash, I can tone down a color that's too clean.
Because I'm so drawn to painting figuratives of old West Indian people of earlier days, toned down colors are what appeal to me. If you have a look at some of my earlier posts ( A Bunch of Things, Abundance, Salsa, Eat Your Veggies ), you can see how I like the color values to be.

I really appreciate this dialogue as much as I enjoy looking at your work- especially the WIP of the red wash background.

I see we share a number of favorite blog writers too.
Frank, Bill- all fine company.

David Lobenberg said...

Bonnie: Maybe it's all my layering, but I don't see my acrylic paintings as dull. I looked at some water based oil paintings I did a while back, and they are no shinier than my acrylics. You know a lot of oils are varnished after they have dried and therefor have a tremendous sheen. I just completed an acrylic that I've put a GOLDEN Polymer Gloss Varnish on....it's just as shiny as any varnished oil! I'll check out those paintings you recommended I look at.

HELENE J said...

great contrasts!
Bravo!

David Lobenberg said...

Thank you so much Helene! Yes indeed, that painting was a tough one.

Peggi Habets Studio said...

Your paintings are beautiful, very unique style. I haven't done a landscape in years and recently heard a well-known portrait painter say that if you want to be a great portrait painter, you should be painting more than just portraits. Also, thanks for the nice commentdtbe on my blog.

benjatoon studio said...

good job! and nice blog! Benjamin:)zak

David Lobenberg said...

Peggi: Thanks for stopping by. Painting anything demands close observation and translation through whatever art medium you are working with, so I guess what you heard holds true.

David Lobenberg said...

Peggi: Thanks for stopping by. Painting anything demands close observation and translation through whatever art medium you are working with, so I guess what you heard holds true.

David Lobenberg said...

Benjatoon Studio: Gracias! You do some killer work dude! Do you work in an animation studio?