Wednesday, March 5, 2008

March 1 Watercolor Portrait Workshop




My workshop met on the second floor art studio at University Art in Sacramento. Anyone arriving at the workshop who might have forgotten an art item had only to go downstairs to purchase what they needed. We did a small color study first. I talked about mixing flesh colors for light complextions. I handed out copies of the contour drawing for the student to tape on the studio window. They taped 140lb, cold press watercolor paper on top and traced using a soft office pencil (this workshop focuses on how to handle the medium of watercolor and is not a drawing class).
After my students get back to their painting stations with their traced drawings, I demonstrate how to get started. I answer any questions they may have, then it's their turn to paint, following my lead. We go step-by-step (I demo, they follow, I demo, they follow etc,) until the water color is completed. The first photo is me demonstrating. The second shows some small studies and a large one in progress. The third photo is a student taking a photo during the course of one of the painting stages.

5 comments:

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

Beautiful, loose portrait. Reminds me a bit of Charles Reid.

David Lobenberg said...

You nailed it Mary!! Chuck is my watercolor mentor.

Destinatus said...

Oh rats! I can't believe I missed this! Is there any chance there will be another workshop soon?

David Lobenberg said...

Tim (destinatus): Yes. In April or May. Shoot me an email, and I'll put you on my workshop email list.

Erica Miles said...

David,

I'm a new "follower." I'd like to say that I'm a fellow artist but I'm self-taught and still have so much to learn and so much experience to gain. I love your style and will come back often to study your "brush strokes" as well as color application. I have six beautiful kids and so have plenty of subjects to work from.

If you ever have advice or helpful hints I could sure use some. I really want to get my work on the market but am scared spitless to do it wrong. The thought of being able to share my talent while "chipping in" financially is a driving motivation and yet keeping all of my responsibilities from falling down around me while being "artist" is a juggling act I usually fail at.

Seeing work like yours inspires me to keep trying. Thank you.