Monday, February 27, 2012

From The Lobenberg Vault

This was an assignment I gave to my oil and acrylic painting students at Sacramento City College a few years ago. This is a good example of NOT painting every damn thing that you are looking at. Hey, none of us really look too closely at much. All you need are a few visual cues (or paint marks) and what you put down on the canvas is still going to come across as say a cup of Starbuck's coffee or a pack of Nutra-Sweet. Get lazy people! Spend less time painting and more time napping in the warm sun.

9 comments:

Meera Rao said...

Love those two pieces of advice especially -"NOT painting every damn thing that you are looking at." and " Al you need are few visual clues....get lazy" --have to hammer that into my head and brush wielding hand ! Have known that for a long while now but sure need to be reminded before every single session!

Dianne said...

Lazy? Heck, I didn't even see the Nutra-sweet, I was looking at the doughnut! If you hadn't mentioned it, I probably would never have gotten past the pastry. However, the Starbucks did make a subliminal impression, just as you said.

RH Carpenter said...

I really think Starbucks should buy this painting from you!

David Lobenberg said...

Meera, Yes. We all need to remind ourselves not to over do it.

David Lobenberg said...

Dianne, Yep, it can sometimes be hard to avert one's eyes from those devilish donuts!

David Lobenberg said...

Hi Rhonda. Not a bad idea.

L.W.Roth, said...

Why haven't I stopped here sooner. Details drove me crazy as a architectural designer,now they would like to drive my paintings cluttered. So far so good, but they are a hard habit to shake. I stopped by Dan's Canvas and Dan said you have a way with leaves, but I see you've got a way with doughnuts too. I paint pastries. I like doughnuts. I think I'll keep an eye on you.

David Lobenberg said...

LW, I'll have another post coming up that speaks about the best way to start a painting and stay away from what I consider irrelevant details.

David Lobenberg said...

LW, I'll have another post coming up that speaks about the best way to start a painting and stay away from what I consider irrelevant details.