Saturday, October 23, 2010

Can you spell T-E-D-I-O-U-S

I am currently painting 7"X7" and 8"X10" watercolors of fruits and vegetables in preparation for a large art and craft fair at the end of November. Here is my painting sequence of some artichokes (yum!!!...good with melted butter, mayonnaise, or garlic infused olive oil). First goes on the yellow greens, wet-on-wet and allowed to flow on a slight tilt of the watercolor paper. Here comes the tedium... painting each individual leaf, going from dark, where the leaf joins the body, to light on the top, prickly point. This is wet on dry. I'm working from a photo reference and really, really need to concentrate on what damn leaf I'm working on! I work on more leaves before I am even close to finishing the first artichoke. I always like to move around my painting and not become myopic on one part. This process rests the eyes and helps to keep things harmonious. Gotta keep concentrating on what damn leaf I'm working on! Painting those two lower chokes help to define the center one, and gives me an idea if the whole painting is going to work out OK in terms of my darks and lights. At last the fun of taking off the border masking tape and seeing my effort "framed". I will later cut a deckled edge where the painting joins the white border and float the piece in a simple frame. I do hope sales are brisk, because this is not the only tedious painting in my collection. Please wish me dood luck and wave me good bye!

22 comments:

Terry Banderas said...

OUTSTANDING POST!!!! Appreciate seeing all of your process and your willingness to share. Love your artwork.

RHCarpenter said...

Tedious, yes, but also beautiful when finished. Love the variety of colors in each petal. Oh, and good luck on the show and sale!!

travelingsuep said...

Oh my what patience you have David. I'm sure I would have given up about step 2. Great result!

Mary said...

Good luck! This is why I don't paint detailed paintings but I certainly like to look at them. Your picture is making me hungry.

David Lobenberg said...

Terry B., Thank you so much my fellow plein air sketch artist friend!

David Lobenberg said...

Rhonda, The thing about tedious painting like this is to suck it up, put on some good music, stay patient, and enjoy!

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Travelingsuep. I bet if you found something you really, really want to paint, you could get into the tedious zone as well.

David Lobenberg said...

I'm glad my artichokes made you hungry, Mary! Thank you for your comment and visiting my blog.

Marleen said...

Inspiring. Good to see the steps to perfection.

Ulrike Miesen-Schürmann said...

Great painting, great painter O:-)

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Marlene. Keep painting!

David Lobenberg said...

Danke, Ulrika.

Barbara M. said...

How do you spell M-A-G-N-I-F-I-C-E-N-T? A teacher question if ever there was one. You have done it again. Uber great.

Take care,

Barbara

devotedmomof7 said...

The results of your efforts are really outstanding!! Thank you for posting the process. I always enjoy watching how others approach a painting. May I ask about "cutting a deckled edge"? How does one cut a deckled edge?

David Lobenberg said...

Of course I kan spell that word, Barbara!...
M-G-N=E-F-E-S-E-N-T. Whot, you think I dum?!

David Lobenberg said...

Cheryl aka:devotedmomof7, I have two ways to deckle edges of watercolor paper (140lb, cold press):
awhile back, I purchased a 3 foot long steel straight edged and rough-cut deckled edged cutter (looks like a long metal ruler. You just hold it down on your paper and pull the paper up and against the deckled edge. You can find these devices in some art catalogues. The easier way is to go to a scrap booking store and purchase deckled edged scissors.

frankeber said...

I am impressed, David! Very happy to link here, you are an amazing artist

Bonnie Luria said...

I tried to cut and paste what everyone before me said.
So therefore I can only add a gigantic ditto.
And how about this- those subtle shifts of slightly different greens are so well done.
( something similar now that I look again from RHCarpenter ).
Next time I have to get here first.

Outstanding David.

David Lobenberg said...

Frank Eber, the feeling is mutual!

David Lobenberg said...

Yea, comrade Bonnie, but now Mr.subtle green shift artichoke leaf guy is going to meet with Mr. Terry Miura and a few other painters of equal ability this Friday for a model painting session! As I am so fond of saying, wish me luck and wave me goodbye.

Liana Yarckin said...

i love your painting style. you make everything look so good!

Vittle me this... said...

wow... love love LOVE the artichokes!