Thursday, September 16, 2010

Fire or no fire, that is the question.

Randall is a very well known chef here in Sacramento, and I have just completed his portrait. QUESTION: How do you paint an interesting chef portrait? I went to his kitchen, and Randall did his famous atomic explosion fry pan cooking trick. Well isn't that just one hell of a cliche image! I took a few snaps to amuse him as testy chefs brandish sharp knives! Then I sat him down and had him hold a bare serving plate and told him DO NOT SMILE. Nary a question passed his lips as to why I took such an obtuse photograph! Artist don't brandish knives, but if you question them, they are wont to sob uncontrollably, and I think he didn't want to travel down that path! A few days later, I had his pastry chef spell Randall's last name in chocolate and marzipan on said serving plate, and I took a snap of that as well. From these two reference photographs, I painted Chef Randall Selland's portrait in acrylic on stretched canvas, 18"X36". Bon appetite!

17 comments:

Benco said...

I like this, the idea is unusual and it really works.

Elizabeth Seaver said...

And everyone thinks the lot of an artist is a happy one--it's hard work.

I love what you came up with. It really makes me wonder about the back story. I love your description of his reaction (and your interpretation of it). Very funny!

Prabha N. said...

Love Randall's expression and the painting!

Fay Akers said...

I like it very much nice idea,

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Benco on the Falklands.

David Lobenberg said...

I'll tellya, Elizabeth, I had no idea what type of photo I was going to end up with when I went into his kitchen. Sometimes, you just need to pray to the creative gods that things will work out.

David Lobenberg said...

I'll tellya, Elizabeth, I had no idea what type of photo I was going to end up with when I went into his kitchen. Sometimes, you just need to pray to the creative gods that things will work out.

David Lobenberg said...

Prabha, His daughter LOVED the expression, and thought I captured her Dad perfectly. He has a great sense of humor and loves to perform cook for the public, but like most chef, he can be a stern task master.

David Lobenberg said...

Glad you like the idea behind this one, Fay!

Barbara M. said...

Hi David,

Magnifico. Love the painting.

Great portrait.

I hope you get a superb meal.

Ciao,

Barbara

Ginny Stiles said...

Oh David...you paint such interesting people and I love that you tie into either their work or hobbies or something to give us a clue about what is going on inside their heads and behind their faces! It makes for a STORY. I love stories.
Many bloggers are choose food themes lately I've noticed and decided it may be a "change of season" theme with all of us.
I love your blog and you never cease to inspire me.

David Lobenberg said...

I hope so too, Barbara. I shall report back.

David Lobenberg said...

Ginny, Yes, that's my MO...story telling. Glad you like my story portrait!

Clive said...

Great to be back for a visit. The portraits are marvellous, and the wine country plein air sketches really outstanding. Don't drink and draw though. Also enjoyed some the technical pointers and observations.

David Lobenberg said...

Hey Clive, you northern submerging artist! Thanks for visiting. Don't be a stranger!

Bonnie Luria said...

You are constantly amazing. Great portrait, love how you staged the idea of presenting him.
Clever guy, terrific painter, inspiring all the time.

David Lobenberg said...

Always good to hear from my friend in paradise, comrade Bonnie! The chef trusted me, and let me stag away. It was great! I wasn't exactly clear what the hell I was doing, but the final pose with the plate felt and looked real good.