Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Downtown Dead End?

The corner of a bank building in downtown Sacramento. Acrylic on stretched canvas, 12"X46", and going nowheresville?, a real downer?, and a dead end? It's not finished.I need to refine some elements such as the windows, and I want to add some brush stroke texture in the shadow side of the building... but... short of adding a dead pedestrian lying in the street, I'm finding it difficult to make this painting interesting :( Signed, In desperate need of advice. aka: woe is me.

20 comments:

Ajay Sathe said...

Hi David,

How about showing a climber (like Alain Robert, a french climber who has climbed more than 60 buildings around the world) on some window and someone watching him/her from the street? That might make this tall painting more interesting.

Ajay

Kathy said...

I wondered what you have been doing lately. You can also have people jumping out of the windows or money falling from them. lol
I didn't even see the people in the shadows. What if you brightened them up. The size sounds like it would make this an awesome painting.

meera said...

move one person into sunlight-crossing the street?- and have the his/her shadow make an interesting shape?-more organic compared to the straight lines- may be? It is a wonderful painting :)

Blasquez Fine Art said...

David,
I think you have a winner here. Maybe some time away from the thing, and it will say to you exactly what to do - or like Kathy said, shed a little light on the couple at the intersection. Very Nice. Looking forward to seeing your Capital Plein Air piece on Friday night.
Happy Painting!
Randy

Paintings by Irit Bourla said...

Just leave it as is.
Beautiful piece!

Ruth said...

David. How about a brightly outfitted, full-geared long-distance bicyclist w/goggles, etc. in sunlight w/strong shadows long morning or afternoon shadows ---crossing street in front of the shadowed couple. (or a policeman on back of beautiful black horse? Don't know if they have those in this city you're portraying where this bank is? Or, if either is allowed on the sidewalk.)
Your bldg. angle is clever and the detail in it is terrific. I studied it all in the large window and really liked the detail, texture, colors. Since this is really all about the bank bldg., the bldg. is rendered interestingly and expertly. Think some exciting activity on the sidewalk or street might add the oomph factor. Also the detail at the top of the columns is unusual and needs something to draw the eye to that area. Would a flying bird/bird formation attract the eye to this area and then the eye of viewer would spy this unusal detail that many may never even see either in your painting or the actual bldg. Just some thoughts. Ruth Bodycott

wayne said...

David, Please believe me that this is a brilliant painting and imo is finished. You and I have each painted for decades-- and it's your call on your own art. Yet sometimes it's hard to see the forest for the trees. (For me anyhow) My recommendation is to do nothing more to it. Nothing more is required imo.

It has 'its own life' already, and I can sense it on my screen all the way over here in Oz! It resonates with much great American art: Hopper, Wyeth, and also the famous Australian artist J Smart. Such resonances distinguish truly great art from lesser work. Yours has that resonant factor, an intangible spirit.
That spirit is art.

I look forward to seeing more like this!

Respectfully & sincerely,
Wayne

Ginny Stiles said...

What about focusing on one window? Making it bright yellow? Intriquing the viewer as to why?

Kathy said...

If this were my work I'd evaluate forms you've established: the design established by color, value, and shape. I'd ignore the objective aspects and concentrate on pattern. Consider Georgia O'Keeffe's city-scapes, for instance. Her Brooklyn Bridge painting is a good example. My two cents ...

Janet Belich said...

Going out on a limb here....Like Irit, I think it's beautiful piece but if you are thinking of changes, perhaps make the shaded side details more subtle and/or have the light peek farther around the corner on the couple, just to define the edges of the figures. This would make the shadows darker with more mystery to the story. For what it's worth...

David Lobenberg said...

WOW!! Lots of good comments! My next post goes into my thoughts a bit further. I invite you to click back and scroll UP, and read it.

Barbara M. said...

Hi David,

I agree with everyone that it's a beautiful painting right now.

To change it? You might use a wild,
dark blue on the shade side, some colour surprise.

Better to decide it's wonderful, because it is, and move on.

Take care,

Barbara

dominique eichi said...

I like Ruth 's though maybe the reflection in one or 2 windows of something unusual.
But if you decide to do nothing it is very good as is. Your transition from top to bottom and dark to light is fabulous. the rest is mere details

http://www.onpainting.wordpress.com said...

Very nice composition idea and being well executed. If I lived in the area I would be taking classes with you all the time.

lifeartist said...

It sure looks OK to me! I know looking at it on screen at resolutions required for the web may not show me all the nuances or its real color saturation, but sure looks good. You may want to try some glazes to enhance color.

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Onpainting (Bill). What?...too cheap to hop a jet to Sacramento for one of my workshops?

David Lobenberg said...

Yes, I was thinking of a nice glaze, Davida. Gladya like it. I'm putting this painting on hold for awhile.

Jenvy Fox said...

How about a kid on the rooftop with a slingshot?

Celeste Bergin said...

Hey David..congratulations for asking everyone in cyberspace what to do--that is risky. I often get unsolicited comments on how to fix things..simply because I am honest and write something like "gah. this painting would make a good frisbee". (Hey, pal..I was just venting my spleen, not asking your advice. haha)
Well....since YOU ASKED. IMHO this painting is too tall and skinny. The format is what is making it uncomfortable. It very nearly looks like you have cropped a larger painting. Nicely rendered, but it simply looks like a detail of a larger painting. Thanks for asking our opinions.

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks for your opinion Celeste. You may be right. I'm letting this painting sit for awhile before evaluating it again.