Sunday, July 26, 2009

Last Day of My Summer Plein Air Class (Art 363- 3 units)

After eight weeks, my weekends are free again! Not that I don't thoroughly enjoy teaching this summer college class. I like moulding my students into good "liars". An art liar is capable of capturing the impression of things, be it buildings, people, plants, etc, etc. without having to get bogged down in tedious, time consuming details. Now I know that there are some of you that love the fine details, but if you want to go outside and paint something, you need to become somewhat of a generalist. The light is going to change radically in about a 2 hour time period or even less. There is no time for fine detail work unless you want to take a photo and finish up in the studio. But even beyond that, completing your art within a two hour time frame leaves you with a loose and fresh looking piece. Leave the finely tuned art for your studio, where, and as we all know, there are no bugs, gawkers, rain, hot sun (moving light source!), and such. Here is what my summer semester plein air students learned: ART IS AN ILLUSION SO BE A GOOD LIAR. "Portuguese Catholic Church on S and 12th Streets, Sacramento" 14"X20" ink drawing and watercolor wash on 140lb. cold press.

24 comments:

Donna McMenamin said...

Love this--would love to take your class.

Ed Terpening said...

Art is telling the truth, with a lie. Picasso said something like that. The best art invites to viewer to participate, and finish the picture in their own way. This is something I'm struggling with. I really tend to go for detail, but I'm getting better at it--especially now that I've restricted myself to painting with only a palette knife for now.

Nice work. I'm sure your classes are inspiring.

Galina Nikolova said...

Beautiful gentle light. Lovely!
Kind regards

Lauren Maurer said...

Me, too! I'd LOVE to take your class! You should taking your class on the road!

Jan Blawat said...

Now I know why I can't paint worth beans. Never could tell a lie! Well, also I have no talent. But I can sure appreciate the heck out of people like you, who do.

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Donna.

David Lobenberg said...

Ed, I haven't visited your blog in a while, and I'm gonna have to hop on over and see your palette knife work!

David Lobenberg said...

Galina, "gentle light"...I like that description! Thank you. Do you want to contribute a self portrait with you wearing a hat or scarf or whatever to my Self Portrait Global Love In blog? The final due date is Sept. 12. We need artists representing eastern Europe.

David Lobenberg said...

Lauren, Wouldn't that be fun!

David Lobenberg said...

Jan, I gotta send you the pic I took of you holding my Big Ears h2o. If you don't get it this week, could you shoot me an email reminder?

cardesin said...

Soft, light as a whisper ...
Beautiful work!
A big hug!

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks Senior C. and a watercolor hug back!

Amber Massey said...

HAHA! I think you've done a fine job of moulding us into liars David!
I actually didn't get a chance to see the finished version of your church, but now that I have I have to say it came out splendid!
See you at the BBQ!

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Amber. Seeya at the Italian fountain and Q.

Mona said...

David, you left a simply gorgeous self-portrait (the watercolor) on the self-portrait blog in May, and I only just saw it today. Enjoyed catching up with your latest work on your blog today also.

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks, Mona. Love those eye paintings and that great photo of you hangin with your Mom and Grandma as they paint.

Quicksilver Spirit said...

Prof, I just love this-both the church and the sentiment. I think you're exactly right about becoming looser, fresher, more "general" en plein air. I sure wish I could've taken the 8-week course this past summer so you could've made me a "liar" too! See you soon. Doriene

David Lobenberg said...

Sharpening your artistic shorthand skills and becoming a more proficient liar takes practice, Dori, and water coloring doesn't make it any easier! But no pain, no gain as they say in the sports world. Seeya sometime again in one of my classes or workshops.

Barbara M. said...

Hi David,

I get your message and love it. I don't call it lying, I call it transforming the truth. It's true that too much accuracy is dull, but not enough is also worrying. You always manage to turn out perfect work. This one's beautiful.

Take care,

Barbara

David Lobenberg said...

Barbara, So true...you need just some detail but need not be caught up in too much of it.

painterchum said...

Well I absolutely love this painting David, it's got zing and audacity, great job! I think that's a great lesson about being a good liar...i never thought about it that way, but it's true you have to be able to hone in on the essence without getting bogged by the details. NIce to see your studio shots too. it's great to see the environment in which artists do their thing.

http://www.onpainting.wordpress.com said...

A very nice lie. And I like those planes.

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks for dropping by and adding me to your blog roll, Sally (Painterchum)!

David Lobenberg said...

Thanks Onpainting. All my life I have loved anything that flies.